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Why I Love Author Interviews

Why I Love Author Interviews

By Amy Yelin   

Yesterday I got a letter from AWP attempting to win me back as a Writer’s Chronicle subscriber (I have no excuse except that I forgot to renew). Inside the envelope was a solicitation letter. And this bookmark:   My first thought upon reading this bookmark was: Right on Joan! Potential bottomless pit of potential humiliation!… Read more »


Review: Dear Gravity by Gregory Djanikian

Review: Dear Gravity by Gregory Djanikian

By Kathleen Aguero   

Dear Gravity by Gregory Djanikian, Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2014, 99 pp/, $16.95. Dear Gravity, the title of Gregory Djanikian’s latest collection of poetry, captures the volume’s intimate and affectionate tone, its ability to treat serious matters without taking itself too seriously, its concern with what anchors us to this world and to one another.… Read more »


7 Questions: An Interview with Marianne Leone

7 Questions: An Interview with Marianne Leone

By Amy Yelin   

Marianne  Leone’s essay “The Official Story” is a Featured Nonfiction piece in the fall issue. She is an actress, screenwriter, and essayist. Her essays and op-ed pieces have appeared in the Boston Globe, The Bark magazine, and WBUR’s Cognoscenti blog. She had a recurring role on HBO’s The Sopranos and has appeared in films by John Sayles, Martin Scorsese, Nancy Savoca, Michael… Read more »


The UnderGrad Writer: On Vulnerability and The Workshop

The UnderGrad Writer: On Vulnerability and The Workshop

By Cassandra Capewell   

The Writers’ Workshop is one of the most important lessons in writing. Workshops are designed to offer writers an array of critiques in order to improve a specific piece. Most college programs, to some extent, incorporate a workshop aspect. As I mentioned in my first blog post, when I initially walked into a class called… Read more »


On Flash Nonfiction, and Judith Kitchen

On Flash Nonfiction, and Judith Kitchen

By Amy Yelin   

I recently read that Judith Kitchen passed away from cancer. I didn’t know Judith personally; we’d never even met. I discovered her via the flash nonfiction anthologies she created and edited, with the aptly named titles:  In Short, In Brief and Short Takes. I fell hard for the flash nonfiction form when my friend Janet introduced me… Read more »


It Takes as Long as it Takes: On Waiting

It Takes as Long as it Takes: On Waiting

By Amy Yelin   

Once upon a time, when I was a young twenty-something server at a restaurant just outside of Boston, my manager called me into his office. “Amy,” he said solemnly. “I need to tell you something. You’re not the stronger waiter.” “Um, I’m not a waiter,” I corrected him. “I’m a waitress.” Looking back, however, if… Read more »


Headline Poetry

Headline Poetry

By Leonard Kress   

I was driving to work a few weeks ago, listening closely to a news report about the survivalist Eric Frein, who had just murdered a Pennsylvania State Trooper and managed to evade capture by hiding out in the dense forests of the Pocono Mountains. Although hundreds of people were engaged in a desperate and dramatic… Read more »


It’s Raining FREE e-Books! November 5 ONLY!

It’s Raining FREE e-Books! November 5 ONLY!

By Amy Yelin   

Don’t miss this November 5th 24-hour offer to download two new eBooks from SolsticeLit Books for FREE Why are we giving away our books? As a valued reader of Solstice Lit Mag, we know you appreciate artful writing that can probe at the spots we all tend to tuck away. We want to encourage you to… Read more »


The Undergrad Writer: Really Bad Drafts

The Undergrad Writer: Really Bad Drafts

By Cassandra Capewell   

I have a theory about all of those happy writers sitting in coffee shops. All of those happy writers sitting in coffee shops are only happy because they’re doing it wrong. I observed these happy writers often from a long Starbucks line at 8:00am through my yawning eyes, and I never once thought I could… Read more »


Review: Leaving the Pink House by Ladette Randolph

Review: Leaving the Pink House by Ladette Randolph

By DeWitt Henry   

LEAVING THE PINK HOUSE: A MEMOIR by Ladette Randolph (University of Iowa Press, 2014, paperback, 228pp) Admiring Ladette Randolph for her Ploughshares editing and her earlier novels, I was fascinated and moved by her new memoir LEAVING THE PINK HOUSE, which is about her investment in her mid-life marriage and centered on renovating a Nebraska… Read more »


Ready to get your blog on?

Ready to get your blog on?

By Amy Yelin   

I am! As the new Managing Editor for Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices, I’m thrilled to be running the SolLit Blog. Each week my aim is to inform, engage and inspire you with good reads about writing craft, writing process, trends in writing and/or literature, author interviews, and perhaps the occasional mini-rant. You can… Read more »


Review: Pretenders by Jeff Friedman

Review: Pretenders by Jeff Friedman

By Kathleen Aguero   

Pretenders by Jeff Friedman, Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2014, 127 pp., $16.95, paperback Each poem in Jeff Friedman’s sixth collection, Pretenders, delights with its linguistic and imaginative invention. The opening poem, “Mud,” sets the tone for the work that follows. From the mysterious first lines—“Out of the river, mud climbed/broken embankments, crooked staircases/gleaming hulls, the… Read more »


Now available on Amazon Kindle!  SOLSTICE, A MAGAZINE OF DIVERSE VOICES  LAUNCHES ITS SECOND eBook THE MESSAGE

Now available on Amazon Kindle! SOLSTICE, A MAGAZINE OF DIVERSE VOICES LAUNCHES ITS SECOND eBook THE MESSAGE

By Eugenio Volpe   

Eugenio Volpe’s first eBook, The Message, is a potent view of Afghanistan soldier Adam Zane’s internal unraveling. Returning home to what he sees as the nothingness of Hartford, CT, Zane divides his time between shooting hoops at the local basketball court and camouflaging the self-loathing that now occupies his inner landscape. If someone would shut down… Read more »


Night Garden by Judith Harris

Review: Night Garden by Judith Harris

By Nancy Mitchell   

Judith Harris’s recent book, Night Garden (Tiger Bark Press, 2013), intrigues us with the poignant chronicle of a gifted child’s burgeoning awareness of the natural world as her primary source of spiritual and artistic nourishment.  This awareness, which redeems her from the crushing sensual and imaginative deprivation of her home environment, grows, as she grows,… Read more »


Mary Bonina’s memoir, My Father’s Eyes

Mary Bonina’s memoir, My Father’s Eyes

By Caitlin McGill   

As I read Mary Bonina’s debut memoir, My Father’s Eyes, I found myself forgetting, over and over, that Bonina was a child during most of its recounted scenes. I would read a passage of Bonina guiding her father, whose vision was slowly escaping him, down familiar neighborhood streets, and suddenly stop. Wait, I’d think, she’s… Read more »


Kathy Aguero and The Irrevocables

Kathy Aguero and The Irrevocables

By Nancy Mitchell   

In after that, Kathy Aguero’s most recent book of poems (Tiger Bark Press, 2013), the speakers—and they are varied—come up against hard irrevocables and the subsequent aftermath of “after that” in which the door to all future possibilities shuts as unequivocally as the door to Dickinson’s soul choosing its own society, and as hard the final mute in the book’s title.

The book opens with Aubade and introduces us to the landscape of Section I: “Pearl gray, blue gray/the mauve tinged gray east,” seems, at first, a traditional song, praising dawn as a blank page of sky onto which the day’s scenarios have yet to be written, plucked from “The air, rich and heavy with holding,” infinite with possibilities. Yet, unlike pop psychologies, which attempt, by a thin string of logic, to tether themselves to quantum physics and posit that the trajectory of one’s fate is launched by free choice, the poem soon informs us Aguero’s speakers will have no such authorial autonomy.


Peace

Peace

By Timothy Mason   


CoCa

CoCa

By Iyeoka Ivie Okoawo   


What’s Wrong with Jonathan Franzen? #firstworldproblem

By Eugenio Volpe   

Sorry that I am just getting to Jonathan Franzen’s “What’s Wrong with the Modern World” essay now. It was published almost a month ago in The Guardian. Bloggers from Slate, The Daily Beast, New Yorker, and New Republic have already blasted it for Franzen’s trademark arrogance. My posting late on a trending topic is inexcusable. It defeats the whole purpose of blogging. It defeats the whole purpose of the Internet. Taking a month to read, digest, and respond to something is reserved for four-color, glossy print. 4G LTE technology is for instantaneous shit-talk, so here I go…


Silvertone by Dzvinia Orlowsky.

Review: Silvertone by Dzvinia Orlowsky

By Kathleen Aguero   

 Dzvinia Orlowsky’s latest collection of poetry, Silvertone, chronicles a family’s history with both tenderness and irony.  These remarkable poems create a paradoxical sense of intimacy and distance, employing the perspective of the spying child who longs to be part of her parents’ intimacy with the knowledge of love that the adult speaker brings to the… Read more »