Guest Blogger Submission Guidelines



Mask of Submission: Alexie, Hudson, and Chou

Mask of Submission: Alexie, Hudson, and Chou

By Danielle DeTiberus   

At 5:30AM on the Tuesday after Labor Day weekend, I woke up to three post-midnight text messages from friends who have the luxury of staying up late. Had I heard about the controversy regarding one of the contributors to Best American Poetry 2015? Did I read the recent blog post by this year’s guest editor,… Read more »


SolLitMag MFA Voices Blog: A Trip to the Planet MFA

SolLitMag MFA Voices Blog: A Trip to the Planet MFA

By Wendy Pierman Mitzel   

I like to tell people who ask about my graduate schoolwork that I gave up the lucrative field of journalism to take up the more practical work of creative writing. Sometimes my audience gets the joke. Graduate MFA students are keenly aware the odds are stacked against us. Very few, we are told, will go… Read more »


An Interview with Martha Collins

An Interview with Martha Collins

By Danielle Legros Georges   

Martha Collins is a poet, translator, the editor-at-large for Field Magazine, and an editor at Oberlin College Press. She is the author of the poetry volumes, Day Unto Day (Milkweed, 2014), White Papers (Pitt Poetry Series, 2012), Blue Front (Graywolf, 2006), Some Things Words Can Do (Sheep Meadow, 1998), A History of a Small Life on a Windy Planet (University of Georgia, 1993), The Arrangement of Space (Gibbs Smith,… Read more »


Dialogue and Respect with an Indie Press

Dialogue and Respect with an Indie Press

By Maggie Kast   

When Fomite Press accepted my first novel, A Free, Unsullied Land, a conversation began. Marc Estrin (editing) and Donna Bister (production) run Fomite along with a couple of interns, and the press is actively engaged with their authors every step of the way. Marc liked my characters and their story, but wanted more about the… Read more »


A Conversation with Poet & Teacher Natasha Sajé

A Conversation with Poet & Teacher Natasha Sajé

By Amy Yelin   

How did you come to poetry? I wrote animal stories as a child. In seventh and eighth grade classes, I’d read Tennyson and Poe, but then my friend Catherine Patterson sent me Sylvia Plath’s Ariel. Poems not in a textbook—and by a woman! I was hooked. In college at the University of Virginia, I took… Read more »


SolLit Dialogue on RACE, CULTURE & CLASS: Cleaving

SolLit Dialogue on RACE, CULTURE & CLASS: Cleaving

By Lisa Friedlander   

Yesterday in Brooklyn, NY I saw young mothers strolling their own children, and Jamaican women strolling other women’s children. Mothers and nannies walked, did errands, negotiated cease fires between siblings, bartered lollipops for patience, tickled and explained the teaming stimuli of the surround. I thought of the ease with which people, beginning as strangers to… Read more »


The Politics of Empathy

The Politics of Empathy

By Jennifer Jean   

For over two years I’ve been researching and writing a poetry collection about sex-trafficking and objectification issues in America. When I give poetry readings there is always at least one person, if not more, from the audience who comes up to me and asks: “Why are you writing about this issue?” What I’ve discovered is,… Read more »


An Interview with Poet Betsy Sholl

An Interview with Poet Betsy Sholl

By Kathleen Aguero   

KA: First, congratulations on winning the 2015 Maine Literary Award for Poetry. I know you’ve won several other awards as well. How does getting this kind of recognition affect your writing or sense of yourself as a poet? BS: This is an interesting question because certainly winning an award is a boost to confidence, and… Read more »


Talking Creative Nonfiction with Michael Steinberg

Talking Creative Nonfiction with Michael Steinberg

By David Fox   

DF: In your craft essay “One Story, Two Narrators” included in the anthology SolLit Selects, you talk about how many personal essays and memoirs fall short, because they fail to create an internal narrative to accompany the surface-level events. Why do you think that so many aspiring nonfiction writers struggle with this? Also, you give some examples… Read more »


Chatting with Author Elizabeth Gonzalez

Chatting with Author Elizabeth Gonzalez

By Mariya Taher   

MT: Your story “0=1” was the Fiction First Runner-up for SolLit Magazine’s  Annual Lit Contest in 2013. Now the story appears in SolLit Selects: Diverse Voices, the magazine’s first print anthology. Congratulations! Could you tell us what inspired you to write this story? EG: The story was inspired by experience, and in fact is so close to… Read more »


Review: I Carry My Mother by Lesléa Newman

Review: I Carry My Mother by Lesléa Newman

By Rebecca Hart Olander   

I Carry My Mother by Lesléa Newman, Headmistress Press, 2015, 108 pp/, $10.00   Lesléa Newman’s latest book, I Carry My Mother takes as its subject the death of the author’s mother and the process of grieving this loss. In this unflinching, layered account, Newman opens a window on a human experience deeply her own… Read more »


Review: City of Eternal Spring by Afaa Michael Weaver

Review: City of Eternal Spring by Afaa Michael Weaver

By Pablo Medina   

City of Eternal Spring by Afaa Michael Weaver, University of Pittsburgh Press, 2014, 96pp/, $15.95   City of Eternal Spring confirms what I felt when I first started reading Afaa Michael Weaver’s poems about ten years ago. He is a master poet who is comfortable in his craft at the same time that he takes… Read more »


Review: Otherwise Unseeable by Betsy Sholl

Review: Otherwise Unseeable by Betsy Sholl

By Alison Stone   

Otherwise Unseeable by Betsy Sholl, The University of Wisconsin Press, 2014, 78pp/, $16.95   Betsy Sholl’s seventh book offers a world of contradictions, the friction of disparate and contradictory objects and experiences struggling to coexist. The first poem, “Genealogy,” begins, “One of her parents was a flame, the other a rope.” Odd juxtapositions continue with… Read more »


Review: A Woman in Pieces Crossed a Sea by Denise Bergman

Review: A Woman in Pieces Crossed a Sea by Denise Bergman

By Barbara Blatner   

A Woman in Pieces Crossed a Sea by Denise Bergman, winner of the West End Press 2013 Patricia Clark Smith Poetry Prize, West End Press, 2014, 72pp/, $14.95   The subtle, fierce poems in Denise Bergman’s new collection, A Woman in Pieces Crossed a Sea, offer a biography of the Statue of Liberty, beginning with… Read more »


A Conversation with José Skinner

A Conversation with José Skinner

By Mariya Taher   

MT: Your short story “The Edge” is included in SolLit Selects: Diverse Voices, the magazine’s first print anthology. Congratulations! Could you tell us what inspired you to write this story?  JS: I’m fairly sure Russell Banks’s “Sarah Cole: A Type of Love Story” was the initial inspiration for “The Edge.” It’s been many years since… Read more »


An Interview with Last Year’s Nonfiction Contest Winner, Mary Collins

An Interview with Last Year’s Nonfiction Contest Winner, Mary Collins

By Amy Yelin   

Your essay “The Coverless Book” won our nonfiction contest last year and is also included in SolLit Selects: Diverse Voices –our first print anthology. It’s a beautifully crafted essay in which you explore your brother Daniel’s death, which followed a number of suicide attempts, by using excerpts from a notebook of his you found after… Read more »


Find us at #AWP15!

Find us at #AWP15!

By Amy Yelin   

Your Guide to All Things SolLit at #AWP15! Visit us at booth 409 at the bookfair with our friends from Talking Writing! We’ll be selling copies of our brand new anthology SolLit Selects:Diverse Voices. Thursday April 9 4 to 6pm Kiernan’s Irish Pub Poet’s Corner, 85 6th Street New Rivers Press Book Launch & Readings Come hear… Read more »


Foreign Text in English Writing

Foreign Text in English Writing

By Kristyn Bacon   

Since I’ve started traveling and living abroad, I’ve developed a growing appreciation for foreign words in English text. While I enjoy the occasional italicized vocabulary, I love reading sentences and dialogue in a foreign language, even one that I don’t understand. Scott Fitzgerald and Ernest Hemingway practiced this regularly in their work. Both lived and… Read more »


Five Questions for Richard Hoffman: On Memory, Race and Family

Five Questions for Richard Hoffman: On Memory, Race and Family

By Lee Hope   

The following is a conversation between SolLit Editor in Chief Lee Hope and Nonfiction Editor Richard Hoffman. Richard  is author of the Half the House: a Memoir, and the poetry collections, Without Paradise, Gold Star Road, winner of the 2006 Barrow Street Press Poetry Prize and the 2008 Sheila Motton Award from the New England Poetry Club, and Emblem. A fiction… Read more »


The Rewards of Re-Reading Body Bereft

The Rewards of Re-Reading Body Bereft

By Laura Eppinger   

2015: My Year of Re-Reads Every year I try to read 52 books in 52 weeks. This has been my New Year’s Resolution for more than a decade, and most years, I’ve kept it. I love to devour fiction and poetry, and so far, I have read something new each week. This year, however, I… Read more »


Writing, Reading and the Art of Connection

Writing, Reading and the Art of Connection

By Mariya Taher   

There is a belief that writing is a solitary act and in moments, I don’t disagree that it is. There are many times, as a writer, where I have had to shut myself off from the rest of the world and delve deep inside my mind to pull out the words that were bouncing around… Read more »


Are we Doomed? The Risks of Writing about Family

By Amy Yelin   

“When a writer is born into a family, the family is doomed,” -Czesław Miłosz   I write a lot about family, my father in particular. You might say I’m obsessed with him. Not in the way I was obsessed with him as a child, when I was a daddy’s girl. Then he was simply larger… Read more »


Recognizing African American Writers for Black History Month

Recognizing African American Writers for Black History Month

By Lee Hope   

In celebration of Black History Month, we are honored to share the work of many celebrated African American and Black authors who have contributed to our magazine over the years. We thank you for your voice, your work, and your willingness to share your pieces with us.   Contributors to Solstice  (alphabetical order by first… Read more »


One Question and The Power of Words

One Question and The Power of Words

By Mariya Taher   

There is no denial that for a writer, words are the strongest tool in our possession. We have a kinship with language and the words we use to describe our feelings and thoughts. We understand the weight of words, the difference, sometimes subtle, between similar words such as hit and strike, or lean and thin.… Read more »