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It’s Raining FREE e-Books! November 5 ONLY!

It’s Raining FREE e-Books! November 5 ONLY!

By Amy Yelin   

Don’t miss this November 5th 24-hour offer to download two new eBooks from SolsticeLit Books for FREE Why are we giving away our books? As a valued reader of Solstice Lit Mag, we know you appreciate artful writing that can probe at the spots we all tend to tuck away. We want to encourage you to… Read more »


The Undergrad Writer: Really Bad Drafts

The Undergrad Writer: Really Bad Drafts

By Cassandra Capewell   

I have a theory about all of those happy writers sitting in coffee shops. All of those happy writers sitting in coffee shops are only happy because they’re doing it wrong. I observed these happy writers often from a long Starbucks line at 8:00am through my yawning eyes, and I never once thought I could… Read more »


Review: Leaving the Pink House by Ladette Randolph

Review: Leaving the Pink House by Ladette Randolph

By DeWitt Henry   

LEAVING THE PINK HOUSE: A MEMOIR by Ladette Randolph (University of Iowa Press, 2014, paperback, 228pp) Admiring Ladette Randolph for her Ploughshares editing and her earlier novels, I was fascinated and moved by her new memoir LEAVING THE PINK HOUSE, which is about her investment in her mid-life marriage and centered on renovating a Nebraska… Read more »


Ready to get your blog on?

Ready to get your blog on?

By Amy Yelin   

I am! As the new Managing Editor for Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices, I’m thrilled to be running the SolLit Blog. Each week my aim is to inform, engage and inspire you with good reads about writing craft, writing process, trends in writing and/or literature, author interviews, and perhaps the occasional mini-rant. You can… Read more »


Review: Pretenders by Jeff Friedman

Review: Pretenders by Jeff Friedman

By Kathleen Aguero   

Pretenders by Jeff Friedman, Carnegie Mellon University Press, 2014, 127 pp., $16.95, paperback Each poem in Jeff Friedman’s sixth collection, Pretenders, delights with its linguistic and imaginative invention. The opening poem, “Mud,” sets the tone for the work that follows. From the mysterious first lines—“Out of the river, mud climbed/broken embankments, crooked staircases/gleaming hulls, the… Read more »


Now available on Amazon Kindle!  SOLSTICE, A MAGAZINE OF DIVERSE VOICES  LAUNCHES ITS SECOND eBook THE MESSAGE

Now available on Amazon Kindle! SOLSTICE, A MAGAZINE OF DIVERSE VOICES LAUNCHES ITS SECOND eBook THE MESSAGE

By Eugenio Volpe   

Eugenio Volpe’s first eBook, The Message, is a potent view of Afghanistan soldier Adam Zane’s internal unraveling. Returning home to what he sees as the nothingness of Hartford, CT, Zane divides his time between shooting hoops at the local basketball court and camouflaging the self-loathing that now occupies his inner landscape. If someone would shut down… Read more »


Night Garden by Judith Harris

Review: Night Garden by Judith Harris

By Nancy Mitchell   

Judith Harris’s recent book, Night Garden (Tiger Bark Press, 2013), intrigues us with the poignant chronicle of a gifted child’s burgeoning awareness of the natural world as her primary source of spiritual and artistic nourishment.  This awareness, which redeems her from the crushing sensual and imaginative deprivation of her home environment, grows, as she grows,… Read more »


Mary Bonina’s memoir, My Father’s Eyes

Mary Bonina’s memoir, My Father’s Eyes

By Caitlin McGill   

As I read Mary Bonina’s debut memoir, My Father’s Eyes, I found myself forgetting, over and over, that Bonina was a child during most of its recounted scenes. I would read a passage of Bonina guiding her father, whose vision was slowly escaping him, down familiar neighborhood streets, and suddenly stop. Wait, I’d think, she’s… Read more »


Kathy Aguero and The Irrevocables

Kathy Aguero and The Irrevocables

By Nancy Mitchell   

In after that, Kathy Aguero’s most recent book of poems (Tiger Bark Press, 2013), the speakers—and they are varied—come up against hard irrevocables and the subsequent aftermath of “after that” in which the door to all future possibilities shuts as unequivocally as the door to Dickinson’s soul choosing its own society, and as hard the final mute in the book’s title.

The book opens with Aubade and introduces us to the landscape of Section I: “Pearl gray, blue gray/the mauve tinged gray east,” seems, at first, a traditional song, praising dawn as a blank page of sky onto which the day’s scenarios have yet to be written, plucked from “The air, rich and heavy with holding,” infinite with possibilities. Yet, unlike pop psychologies, which attempt, by a thin string of logic, to tether themselves to quantum physics and posit that the trajectory of one’s fate is launched by free choice, the poem soon informs us Aguero’s speakers will have no such authorial autonomy.


Peace

Peace

By Timothy Mason   


CoCa

CoCa

By Iyeoka Ivie Okoawo   


What’s Wrong with Jonathan Franzen? #firstworldproblem

By Eugenio Volpe   

Sorry that I am just getting to Jonathan Franzen’s “What’s Wrong with the Modern World” essay now. It was published almost a month ago in The Guardian. Bloggers from Slate, The Daily Beast, New Yorker, and New Republic have already blasted it for Franzen’s trademark arrogance. My posting late on a trending topic is inexcusable. It defeats the whole purpose of blogging. It defeats the whole purpose of the Internet. Taking a month to read, digest, and respond to something is reserved for four-color, glossy print. 4G LTE technology is for instantaneous shit-talk, so here I go…


Silvertone by Dzvinia Orlowsky.

Review: Silvertone by Dzvinia Orlowsky

By Kathleen Aguero   

 Dzvinia Orlowsky’s latest collection of poetry, Silvertone, chronicles a family’s history with both tenderness and irony.  These remarkable poems create a paradoxical sense of intimacy and distance, employing the perspective of the spying child who longs to be part of her parents’ intimacy with the knowledge of love that the adult speaker brings to the… Read more »


Poemviews by Kurt Brown:
In The Kingdom of the Sea Monkeys, Campbell McGrath, Ecco Press

By Kurt Brown   

In the Kingdom of the Sea Monkeys, Campbell McGrath’s new book, rare linguistic fauna rear up, line by line, re-constructed from the DNA of 19th century verbiage, hefty sentences of pith and moment dwarfing much contemporary verse. Complexity of clause, words thought extinct, sinuous syntax that wraps itself around ideas about poetry and poetry’s place

Solstice lit mag at AWP: (L to R) Richard Hoffman, nonfic editor; Lee Hope, editor-in-chief; Clint McCown, author.

Solstice lit mag at AWP & Contest Announcement

By Lee Hope   

Announcing our annual LIT CONTEST. $1,000 FICTION PRIZE. Final judge: TBA. The $500 STEPHEN DUNN PRIZE in Poetry. And the $500 NONFICTION PRIZE, donated by Michael Steinberg. Final Judge: Randall Kenan. Also our new $500 E-BOOK PRIZE. Reading fee: $18.00. (For e-book $28.00.) New Contest deadline April 19th!


The Reading Dead

By Eugenio Volpe   

George Saunders newest short story collection The Tenth of December has been released just in time for the third season continuation of The Walking Dead which airs February 10th on AMC. The show is a morality tale set during a zombie apocalypse. Currently it’s the most literary drama on American television (and that ain’t the… Read more »


Roland-Merullo

Interview with writer Roland Merullo

By Lee Hope   

Hello, this is Lee Hope, editor-in-chief of Solstice: A Magazine of Diverse Voices, an online magazine with a mission: to promote diversity of all types in the literary arts and in photography. With our newly designed Fall/Winter 2012 issue, we are beginning a new series of informal, provocative, and sporadically amusing, Audio Author Chats. We’ll… Read more »


Margins

Margins

By Eugenio Volpe   

“The writer is the person who stands outside society, independent of affiliation and independent of influence. The writer is the man or woman who automatically takes a stance against his or her government…American writers ought to stand and live in the margins, and be more dangerous. Writers in repressive societies are considered dangerous. That’s why… Read more »


Dennis Nurkse’s new collection reviewed by Richard Hoffman

Dennis Nurkse’s new collection reviewed by Richard Hoffman

By Richard Hoffman   

Book Review A Night in Brooklyn, D. Nurkse. New York, Alfred A. Knopf. 2012 D. Nurkse’s tenth collection of poems, A Night in Brooklyn, is the spiritual chronicle of a marriage. The couple, making every effort at a true mutuality, even a revolutionary parity, contend with themselves and one another in a skein of lyrics… Read more »


Ferlinghetti Still Minds a Fascist State

By Eugenio Volpe   

~ Poet and publisher Lawrence Ferlinghetti recently declined a Hungarian literary prize worth $64,000, citing the right-wing authoritarian policies of that country’s government as his reasoning. In June 2011, the conservative Fidesz party passed a number of authoritarian and nationalistic laws in parliament protecting their majority-holding status. The unpopular laws also expanded the voting system… Read more »