Welcome to our new website with a more interactive design—frequently updated blog posts, lit events, announcements, and much more! Deep thanks to our Web Developer, Andrai Whitted!

Also, our Tenth Anniversary will kick off with our Spring 2018 Issue, online and in print, including new guest editors, such as Stephen Dunn, Pulitzer Prize winner in poetry. And a tribute to Dzvinia Orlowsky for poetry in translation.

Vitally, Solstice is taking an urgent stand for diversity in lit, with a new call for pieces promoting social justice.  See Blog Editor’s note for details!

Now to our fabulous new Fall/Winter 2017 Issue.  Check individual editors’ notes for the scoop on terrific established and emerging authors of various nationalities, races, classes, religions, ethnicities, and genders! And view the art of acclaimed photographer Christopher James!

Because of our commitment, please make an end of year donation to diversity in lit!  Our nonprofit survives on your generosity.  Please donate and keep us live! 

Onwards,
Lee Hope, Editor-in-chief.

Read the issue

We at Solstice have a passionate focus—to foster diversity in literature and photography while upholding the strictest standards of craft. As part of our mission, we are beginning a series of postings on our blog dedicated to social justice issues, making clear that we stand for equal rights and justice for all people, regardless of class, race, religion, creed, sexual orientation, gender, or nationality. If you have a relevant piece, submit to our blog. Join our community. Take a stand.

Amy Grier, Managing Editor

New from the SolLit Blog:


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Deadly Love: The Cost of Silence on Domestic Violence

By Anita Ballestros

Last week, a young woman, 20 years old, a classmate of my son’s from kindergarten through graduation, was murdered. In the sleepy bedroom community that we live in, such news is always shocking. There is a bubble of safety, or the illusion of it, that surrounds us here. She was killed — no, not killed, violently slaughtered – by her boyfriend, in a wealthy, predominantly white suburb close to Boston.


Neurodiverse Students Need Creative Arts

By Donnie Welch

I run poetry workshops for students with developmental disabilities. Every week I meet with thirty-six students to work on the writing of original poetry. By and large, creative work and arts education is met with skepticism in neurodiverse education. It can be cute to do the occasional, holiday art project, but researchers can’t track data from it, school districts can’t quantify the results of it, and, as a result, schools can’t fund it.


Poetry as Penumbra in the Midst of Political Upheaval (and meet our new intern!)

By Robbie Gamble and Anita Ballestros

Managing Editor’s Note: Today we feature poet, essayist, and social justice activist Robbie Gamble. Robbie considers the purpose and function of poetry in the context of this year’s solar eclipse and political upheaval, writing that poetry can help us “explore the emotional nuances we are experiencing at the edge of all the chaos.”

First, read an introduction by our new intern, Anita Ballesteros. Anita comes to Solstice Magazine from Lesley University’s MFA program, where she studies fiction writing. As you’ll see, Anita has led a fascinating life full of travel, diverse experiences, education, and motherhood. Welcome Anita!