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Solstice Literary Magazine is a compilation of stories, ideas, and experiences of community members from all over. The magazine is a space that allows for people to write freely and purposefully, nurturing meaningful interaction and conversation among topics of diversity and social justice.

We value diverse voices and perspectives that examine the full spectrum of human experiences, amplify marginalized perspectives, and explore what it means to have a more compassionate and equitable society as we move into our future. Please visit our “Features” page for guidelines.


Recent Awards

Solstice Literary Magazine is proud to have published Baron Wormser’s essay Hannah Arendt in New York,” which is included  in The Best American Essays 2018! This essay exemplifies our ten-year commitment to promoting diversity in its many forms in literature and photography.


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– From all the staff at Solstice

New from the Solstice Features blog:


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precinct #2

By David Janey

the stale smell of adolescence lingers still in the varnished wood floors and bleachers of my high school gymnasium. Memories aged fifty years now are just that: faded but not gone, like a scar from an ancient wound or the sting of a racist slight. Only on election days do we come here, only to… Read more »


The Advantage of Citizenship

By Christina Baquero Dudley

Let me take you on a trip. It’s right about the turn of the century, and I’m a 15-year-old engrossed in everything normal and expected: blink 182, school, friends, and boys. Except there is one aspect that’s not so normal in my suburban upbringing: my father is not a U.S. citizen. And that didn’t mean… Read more »


Michael Ansara

1968 and Now

By Michael Ansara

My 28-year-old son turns to me, “You failed, you failed.” We are attempting to discuss the morality of the moment. Is violence against police morally defensible? Is there any case that can be made to not vote? I am attempting to pass on lessons from my youth. He is having none of it. “You failed completely,” he hurls at me in bitter condemnation. “Completely.”